Reel Indie Film Festival Review: A Little Bit Country (2012)

1026

a_little_bit_country_2012_1


Cast: Richard Southgate, Tim McInnerny, Kazia Pelka
Director: Amy Coop
Country: UK
Genre: Short | Comedy | Family


Editor’s Notes: The following review is part of our coverage of the Reel Indie Film Festival. For more information on the festival visit http://reelindiefilmfest.com/ and follow the event on Twitter at @RIFF_Toronto. A Little Bit Country screens on Thursday October 17th at 9:00 PM at The Royal in Toronto as a supporting short to Musicwood, reviewed here.

It’s more than mere conjecture to make the leap from the pre-title scene of awkward discovery that opens A Little Bit Country to something wholly more serious; as off-handedly absurd as a mother discovering her son in the process of donning cowboy boots may be, there’s a non-specificity to the sequence that allows our imagination to take flight and insert our own experience instead. That’s the genial genius of this little film from Amy Coop: treating a silly subject with deadpan drama, it becomes about so much more than it seems.

Handsomely shot—and cut by Coop herself under the pseudonym with which she has worked in various assistant directorial capacities on movies as varied as Gulliver’s Travels and Basic Instinct 2A Little Bit Country effectively channels professional productions into this pristine passion project. Expertly spread across just seven minutes, it’s a film that understands perfectly how to play its cards, emphasising awkwardness to bait a final sweet reveal.

Coop has conceived a neat little narrative here that she brings to life with concise clarity. The brevity of the material, together with tongue-in-cheek nature of its humour and they eventually sweet outro, almost dismissively disengages with the underlying ideas, and that—in a sense—is part of the charm.

a_little_bit_country_2012_2Strong work from a delightfully reactionary cast in the movie’s anchor: Richard Southgate excels particularly as they outed teen, his aghast face communicating all that needs to be said as his shocked parents lament: “I mean, the porn we expected, but… but this…” Tim McInnerny and Kazia Pelka exude parental panic, the former’s body language as economic an example of “we’re not mad, we’re just disappointed” as could be.

Coop has conceived a neat little narrative here that she brings to life with concise clarity. The brevity of the material, together with tongue-in-cheek nature of its humour and they eventually sweet outro, almost dismissively disengages with the underlying ideas, and that—in a sense—is part of the charm. A Little Bit Country is a delightfully simple story of acceptance, of coming to terms with the truth of the people you think you know, and loving them all the more for it.

[notification type=”star”]74/100 ~ GOOD. A Little Bit Country is a delightfully simple story of acceptance, of coming to terms with the truth of the people you think you know, and loving them all the more for it.[/notification]

Share.

About Author

Ronan Doyle is an Irish freelance film critic, whose work has appeared on Indiewire, FilmLinc, Film Ireland, FRED Film Radio, and otherwhere. He recently contributed a chapter on Arab cinema to the book Celluloid Ceiling, and is currently entangled in an all-encompassing volume on the work of Woody Allen. When not watching movies, reading about movies, writing about movies, or thinking about movies, he can be found talking about movies on Twitter. He is fuelled by tea and has heard of sleep, but finds the idea frightfully silly.