Browsing: NP Approved

NP Approved
75

With great film, each subsequent viewing has the power to make you believe that this is the time you truly “got” the film. You convince yourself that you only understood the film superficially on previous viewings, but this is the time that you were totally in tune with the images on display. You are able to contextualize each scene with more objectivity than any previous viewing and have numerous “aha!” moments wondering why you couldn’t see things so clearly before. A great film has the ability to do this to you for at least a few re-watches, a masterpiece will do this to you every single time you revisit the film. The trick is to keep these new revelations in objective context on the back burner as they betray the emotional context, and a Tarkovsky film should be felt and not rationalized. If you are able to strike that balance then you are rewarded with the richest experience that one could hope for when revisiting a film.

NP Approved
75

For Malick, The Tree of Life is a culmination of a life’s work that while only five films in total is more rich and full than most who have stepped behind the lens of camera. Throughout its duration we feel we are in the company of greatness; in the hands of a man who has a better grasp on life and more to say about it than we ever will.

Horror
59

Many is the film which has, on initial release, been critically dismissed and largely ignored, only to be later heralded as a masterpiece of cinema. Such is certainly the case with The Night of the Hunter, a film so poorly regarded upon its original 1955 release that its director—the actor Charles Laughton—was never again afforded the opportunity to stand behind a camera.

NP Approved
0

It is difficult to reconcile the inquisitiveness and doubt that are intrinsic to human nature from an evolutionary perspective. Why did we develop a boundlessly curious nature? What purpose does it serve for the survival and propagation of our species? We put ourselves above all other living creatures in the hierarchy of the living world because we possess consciousness and an insatiable appetite for knowledge and discovery, but what is it exactly that we are searching for?

NP Approved
5

Andrei Rublev may be one of the few high water marks of cinematic achievement. It is difficult to reflect on the film while resisting the temptation to describe it with overwrought hyperbole. Its masterful use of historical context, religious overtones, and the grandiosity of its epic scale laid the framework for Tarkovsky’s deeply personal and introspective ruminations on the redemption of humanity.

NP Approved
3

Long has the western genre been plagued by the Hollywood romanticized interpretations of the old west derived from popular Western fiction, including the writings of Zane Grey and Louis L’Amour. This traditional view of western cinema is largely composed of the iconic cowboy figure, climatic showdowns at dawn, and beautiful desert landscapes.

NP Approved
1

The movie opens with a sword held at a forty-five degree angle pointing at the mossy ground. Then the knight holding the sword swings slowly at his opponent and severs his head and then the decapitated victim falls to the ground and the blood shoots out like a scarlet spray. Other images of improbable violence follow. Once this litany of gruesome comedy is over, there begins a perverse version of the Arthurian legend, where everything is indescribably wrong, like a film projected at the wrong speed or based on discarded outtakes. An aesthetic that never falters, up to the bloody and severely anti-climactic end, an awkward close to parallel the flying heads and reddish squirts of the first scenes.

NP Approved
0

We begin with Tarkovsky’s first feature length film, Ivan’s Childhood. It follows a twelve year old Ivan through the harsh landscapes of a Soviet landscape torn by war. He is hardened by the ugliness of war and has the demeanor of the saltiest war veteran one could find. He has seen far too much during his short existence and has gained the ability to compartmentalize his emotions in a way that is a sin against youthfulness. His loss of innocence is that of humanity’s and there will be no turning back for us as our sins are too great.

NP Approved
113

I had a hard time deciding whether or not I should try to write about Apichatpong Weerasethakul’s Blissfully Yours /≥ mnbv. It was such a moving cinematic experience that I felt an obligation to share my appreciation of the film with anyone who would listen, but on the other hand I feel like trying to reduce the experience in to a few paragraphs on with my less than stellar writing ability would be a sin and an insult to its poetic beauty. I decided to go with a happy middle ground and express my appreciation without attempting to articulate anything about the viewing experience.

NP Approved
72

La Notte follows a married couple through the day and the night that they finally realized that their love was dead. The day starts with the confrontation of mortality as they visit a dying friend in the hospital. This visitation fuels realizations in the wife and adds kindling to old fires that had long since died. She can see clearly for the first time the emptiness of their lifestyle and the complete disappearance of the love that had slowly eroded over the course of many years and many champagne soaked book release parties. She spends the rest of the evening in an isolated soul search seeking out the old haunts where love used to be tangible and in the pursuit of some sort of stimulation that might rekindle the dead passion in their lives. The passion had already been dead for a long time, she just finally came to the penultimate realization.

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