Author Kamran Ahmed

Kamran's areas of interest include formalism, realism & reality, affect, and notions of the aesthetic. With experiences as a TA, an event panelist, a presenter at conferences from UofT to Harvard, and a writer of a self-authored film blog, Kamran would like to share with others his profound interest in the profilmic in the hopes of inspiring, in them, a similar love for film.

Film Festival
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What begins as a relatively generic documentary about a humble man, spoken word poet Shane Koyczan, who made his voice his means of living, builds towards an emphatic and emotionally resonant climax wherein Shane’s estranged father listens to him use his gift to shed all his feelings about the man who was never there…

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With impressive narrative structure, this black and white buddy film carries great emotional resonance as character arcs reach thoughtful conclusions. The protagonists, Pickle and Belly Button, are exceptionally crafted, with multiple layers of their personalities slowly unfurling throughout the film’s duration. What becomes the central conflict of the film is eschewed in order to depict the..

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Bourges impressive feature conveys through a highly restrained formal structure how bureaucracy plays a role in the dehumanization of those caught in the system. His near mathematical use of long still takes paired with silence encourage the viewer to reflect inwardly; a sense of introspection forwards the film’s harmonized rhythm from beginning to end—a remarkable quality for a young director. Deftly…

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65 years after helping pioneer the French New Wave, Agnes Varda perpetuates the movement with yet another film which harks back to its origins—elements of intellectual self-reflection and realization. She brings to the fore the art of filming the process of filming which Godard in particular enmeshed in his otherwise fictitious films. With Faces Places, Varda and J.R.—a remarkable photographer and…

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Three stories intertwine when distinct characters of the underworld become involved in a lowlife’s criminal act of organ harvesting and human trafficking. Structured in four chapters, with the first three depicting the same time frame, Lowlife feels like an episodic narrative or vignette of short stories. These stories come together for the final act—a gruesome yet captivating end…

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Loving Vincent, an animated film produced entirely of painted frames, is a testament to the vast possibilities of the cinematic arts and at once a complete denial of this potential. A brilliant innovation and a marvel to behold—painting, portraiture, and the fluidity of image strike awe in its viewer, recognizing at once that history has been made.

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Peterson’s coming-of-age documentary chronicles six years in the life of Zachariah Doomadgee, an aboriginal growing up in Sydney, far away from his peoples land claim and culture. His father teaches him about his people, in an effort to maintain the culture, but Zach feels always split between the…

Film Festival
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Goetschel’s fascinating documentary takes viewers behind closed doors and into the past of a secret Soviet city, known as City 40, which was built for the purposes of off-the-grid nuclear testing and armament. Central to City 40 is a Nuclear Plant named Mayak, built in the mid-1940s soon after the…

NP Approved
9.0
36

The critically acclaimed House of Flying Daggers, masterfully directed by Fifth Generation Chinese filmmaker Zhang Yimou, combines romance and drama with action and adventure. A wuxia (martial arts) film in the vein of King Hu’s A Touch of Zen (1971) or Yimou’s previous film Hero (2002), House of Flying Daggers uses dazzling …

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