Author Jacqueline Valencia

I'm a published writer, illustrator, and film critic. Cinema has been a passion of mine since my first viewing of Milius' Conan the Barbarian and my film tastes go from experimental to modern blockbuster.

Film Festival
0

I’ve been privileged this year to watch a few films that impart slices of real life in every day or surrealistic settings. These types of movies can render the eye and the heart into some unchartered territory that provokes anger, empathy, and most of all, meditative thought. TIFF never fails to bring…

Film Festival
0

A mentally disabled 60 year-old woman named Pia realizes her 80 year-old mother will die one day. Her mother thinks it would be good idea to posit a group home so that she will know her daughter will be safe and happy. Her daughter on the other hand believes finding a man to marry might be the better option…

Film Festival
0

Sometimes I get the privilege of reviewing films that move me. Stories if told right by their director or writer touch viewers with inspiring emotions or just a simple human experience that they can relate to. I had the opportunity of reviewing two films for the DOC NYC: one which I can connect with in the real world and hope others can to, and the other for revealing stories that so desperately need to be told…

Film Festival
7.5
0

First thing I want to see about this film is the incredible cinematography by Benjamin Loeb. Capturing the long and harsh winters of Prince George, British Colombia, Loeb’s lens casts a clear, but perceptive eye with beautiful blue and green tones that blends in well with the bits of city life in the story…

Film Festival
7.5
0

I was talking the other day about how I’m tired of the writer trope in films. Misunderstood genius who sees the forest for the trees and lives a tortured lifestyle that feeds his pen. That’s right, he. There are lot movies about writers, real life ones too, but most of them are about men under that same literary trope. This is why it was refreshing to see an upbeat comedy about a female writer and her family at TIFF…

Film Festival
8.0
0

The desert is a poetic constraint that regenerates when people and their lives inhabit it. The wind blows over arid environments creating a fresh canvas at the light break of the sun. Oliver Laxe’s Mimosas plays out like a classical western film where there are potential double crossers, semi-saviors, and suspenseful stand offs. Yet this movie also offers so much more…

Film Festival
8.0
0

In the 1980s, Director Livia Ungur was a young child during communist rule in Romania where most of the citizens were exposed to very little western fare. One of the shows that did make it there was the long running American television soap opera called Dallas. Starring Patrick Duffy, Linda Grey, Larry Hagman and others, the show captivated its audiences with its allure of glamour, intrigue, and corruption…

Reviews
8.0
0

At first, the film seems one of a complicated subject: Mr. Badii (Homayon Ershadi) drives around Tehran looking for someone who will bury him after he commits suicide. He doesn’t come right out and say it, but tells candidates there is big money in this small job. Not at any time of the film are we given his motivations for…

Interviews
116

The suggestions of magical realms within our own realities are often dismissed as part of the human imagination. Sometimes superstition and fantasy are ways people use to try to survive insurmountable truths thereby helping them navigate a world that they cannot fully understand. In Apichatpong Weerasethakul’s Cemetery of Splendour, the director…

1 2 3 15